Menú Principal

Guía de Práctica Clínica - No GES

Tratamiento Conservador No Dialítico de la Enfermedad Renal Crónica

Recomendación T8 – Juicio del Panel y Evidencia

T8.-En personas con enfermedad renal crónica en etapa 5 en tratamiento conservador no dialítico, el Ministerio de Salud SUGIERE hídratación sin restricción en comparación a restringir.

Comentarios del Panel de Expertos:
►Esta recomendación no aplica para personas con insuficiencia cardíaca congestiva.

A continuación se presenta la “Tabla de la evidencia a la decisión” con el resumen de los juicios, la evidencia de investigación evaluada, consideraciones adicionales y comentarios planteados por el panel.

 1.- ¿El problema es una prioridad?
No Probablemente no Probablemente sí Varía No lo sé

El problema ha sido definido como prioritario del Departamento de Enfermedades No Transmisibles del Ministerio de Salud.

 2.- ¿Qué tan significativos son los efectos deseables anticipados?
Trivial Pequeño Moderado Grande Varía No lo sé

Triviales: El equipo elaborador de la Guía estimó que los efectos deseables de «usar hidratación restringida» en comparación a «usar hidratación sin restricción» son triviales o no relevantes, considerando la evidencia, experiencia clínica, conocimiento de gestión o experiencia de las personas con la condición o problema de salud.

Evidencia de investigación

Hidratación restringida para enfermedad renal crónica en etapa 5

 

Pacientes

 Enfermedad renal crónica en etapa 5

 

Intervención

Hidratación no restringida

 

Comparación

Hidratación restringida

 

Desenlaces

Efecto

Certeza de la evidencia

(GRADE)

Mensajes clave en términos sencillos

 
 

Mortalidad

No se identificaron revisiones sistemáticas ni estudios comparativos que permitan estimar el efecto de la intervención sobre la mortalidad.

 

Hospitalización

No se identificaron revisiones sistemáticas ni estudios comparativos que permitan estimar el efecto de la intervención sobre el riesgo de hospitalización.

 

GRADE: Grados de evidencia Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation.
Fecha de elaboración de la tabla: Agosto, 2018

Referencia

1. Palmer SC, Hanson CS, Craig JC, Strippoli GF, Ruospo M, Campbell K, Johnson DW, Tong A. Dietary and Fluid Restrictions in CKD: A Thematic Synthesis of Patient Views From Qualitative Studies. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation. 2015;65(4):559-73.
2. de Brito-Ashurst I, Perry L, Sanders TA, Thomas JE, Yaqoob MM, Dobbie H. Barriers and facilitators of dietary sodium restriction amongst Bangladeshi chronic kidney disease patients. Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association. 2011;24(1):86-95.
3. King N, Carroll C, Newton P, Dornan T. «You can’t cure it so you have to endure it»: the experience of adaptation to diabetic renal disease. Qualitative health research. 2002;12(3):329-46.
4. Hollingdale R, Sutton D, Hart K. Facilitating dietary change in renal disease: investigating patients’ perspectives. Journal of renal care. 2008;34(3):136-42.
5. Tong A, Sainsbury P, Chadban S, Walker RG, Harris DC, Carter SM, Hall B, Hawley C, Craig JC. Patients’ experiences and perspectives of living with CKD. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation. 2009;53(4):689-700.
6. Walker R, James H, Burns A. Adhering to behaviour change in older pre-dialysis populations–what do patients think? A qualitative study. Journal of renal care. 2012;38(1):34-42.
7. Al-Arabi S. Quality of life: subjective descriptions of challenges to patients with end stage renal disease. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2006;33(3):285-92.
8. Bass EB, Jenckes MW, Fink NE, Cagney KA, Wu AW, Sadler JH, Meyer KB, Levey AS, Powe NR. Use of focus groups to identify concerns about dialysis. Choice Study. Medical decision making : an international journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making. 1999;19(3):287-95.
9. Beer J. Body image of patients with ESRD and following renal transplantation. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing). 1995;4(10):591-8.
10. Bennett PN, Bonner A, Andrew J, Nankumar J, Au C. Using images to communicate the hidden struggles of life on dialysis. J Commun Healthc. 2013;6(1):12-21.
11. Berg J, Berg BL. Compliance, diet and cultural factors among black Americans with end-stage renal disease. Journal of National Black Nurses’ Association : JNBNA. 1989;3(2):16-28.
12. Bordelon TD. An examimation of empowerment at a kidney center as experienced by persons who receive hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal disease. Montana State University. 1997;
13. Cases A, Dempster M, Davies M, Gamble G. The experience of individuals with renal failure participating in home haemodialysis: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of health psychology. 2011;16(6):884-94.
14. Costello T.. Conceptions of Illness and Adaptation in Adults With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Partnership Model of Inquiry. Boston, MA: Department of Counseling, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods, Counseling Psychology Program,. 1999;The Graduate School of Education, Boston College; 1999.
15. Curtin RB, Johnson HK, Schatell D. The peritoneal dialysis experience: insights from long-term patients. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2005;31(6):615-24.
16. Dekker W, Uerz I, Wils JP. Living well with end stage renal disease: patients’ narratives interrupted from a virtue perspective. Ethical theory and moral practice : an international forum. 2005;8(5):485-506.
17. Duffy M. Intrafamilial Kidney Transplants: The Impact on the Sibling Relationship Among Donors, Recipients and Volunteers. The Faculty of the Department of Professional Psychology, Chestnut Hill College. 2009;
18. Fex A, Ek AC, Söderhamn O. Self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home. Journal of clinical nursing. 2009;18(20):2809-17.
19. Fisher R, Gould D, Wainwright S, Fallon M.. Quality of life after renal transplantation. J Clin Nurs.. 1998;7((6)):553-563.
20. Ford-Anderson CA. The Impact of Demographics, Social Support and Health Beliefs on Adherence to Hemodialysis Treatment Regimen. New York, NY: Wurzeiler School of Social Work, Yeshiva University-Wilf Campus. 2010;
21. Giles S. Transformations: a phenomenological investigation into the life-world of home haemodialysis. Social work in health care. 2003;38(2):29-50.
22. Griva K, Ng HJ, Loei J, Mooppil N, McBain H, Newman SP. Managing treatment for end-stage renal disease–a qualitative study exploring cultural perspectives on facilitators and barriers to treatment adherence. Psychology & health. 2013;28(1):13-29.
23. Hume MR. Factors influencing dietary adherence as perceived by patients on long-term intermittent peritoneal dialysis. Nursing papers. Perspectives en nursing. 1984;16(1):38-54.
24. Humphreys S. Shifting life’s Focus: African American Dialysis Patients’ Experiences With Kidney Transplant Evaluation. Fairfax, VA: Graduate Faculty, George Mason University. 2011;
25. Ismail S, Lutchenburg A, Massey E, Clasassens L, van Busschbach J, Weimar W. Living kidney donation among ethnic minorities: a Dutch qualitative study on attitudes, communication, knowledge and needs of kidney patients. A report on the basis of the cooperation of the Kidney Transplant Unit of the Erasmus MC and the Department of Medical Psychology and Psychotherapy of the Erasmus MC. Med Psychol Psychother. 2010
26. Karamanidou C, Weinman J, Horne R. A qualitative study of treatment burden among haemodialysis recipients. Journal of health psychology. 2014;19(4):556-69.
27. Krespi Boothby MR, Salmon P. [Self-efficacy and hemodialysis treatment: a qualitative and quantitative approach]. Turk psikiyatri dergisi = Turkish journal of psychiatry. 2013;24(2):84-93.
28. Lai AY, Loh AP, Mooppil N, Krishnan DS, Griva K. Starting on haemodialysis: a qualitative study to explore the experience and needs of incident patients. Psychology, health & medicine. 2012;17(6):674-84.
29. Lam LW. Adherence to a Therapeutic Regimen Among Chinese Patients Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis. Hong Kong: The Chinese University of Hong Kong. 2012;
30. Martin-McDonald K. Being dialysis-dependent: a qualitative perspective. Collegian (Royal College of Nursing, Australia). 2003;10(2):29-33.
31. Mayers JD. Dietary restrictions in maintenance hemodialysis: experiences of English speaking West Indian adults. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2000;27(3):315-9.
32. Munakata T. Psycho-social influence on self-care of the hemodialysis patient. Soc Sci Med. 1982;16:1254-1264.
33. Namiki S, Rowe J, Cooke M. Living with home-based haemodialysis: insights from older people. Journal of clinical nursing. 2010;19(3-4):547-55.
34. Ndlovu P, Louw J. Making sense of kidney transplantation: a view from African recipients. Clinical transplantation. 1998;12(3):250-5.
35. Polaschek N. ‘Doing dialysis at home’: client attitudes towards renal therapy. Journal of clinical nursing. 2007;16(3A):51-8.
36. Polaschek N. Living on dialysis: concerns of clients in a renal setting. Journal of advanced nursing. 2003;41(1):44-52.
37. Pradel FG, Mullins CD, Bartlett ST. Exploring donors’ and recipients’ attitudes about living donor kidney transplantation. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.). 2003;13(3):203-10.
38. Russ AJ, Shim JK, Kaufman SR. The value of «life at any cost»: talk about stopping kidney dialysis. Social science & medicine (1982). 2007;64(11):2236-47.
39. Rygh E, Arild E, Johnsen E, Rumpsfeld M. Choosing to live with home dialysis-patients’ experiences and potential for telemedicine support: a qualitative study. BMC nephrology. 2012;13:13.
40. Sinclair PM, Parker V. Pictures and perspectives: a unique reflection on interdialytic weight gain. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2009;36(6):589-96; quiz 597.
41. Stanfill A, Bloodworth R, Cashion A. Lessons learned: experiences of gaining weight by kidney transplant recipients. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.). 2012;22(1):71-8.
42. Sussmann K. Patients’ experiences of a dialysis diet and their implications for the role of the dietitian. Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation. 2001;11(3):172-7.
43. Theofilou P, Synodinou C, Panagiotaki H. Undergoing haemodialysis: A qualitative study to investigate the lived experiences of patients. European Journal of Psychology of Education. 2013;9(1):19-32.
44. Tovazzi ME, Mazzoni V. Personal paths of fluid restriction in patients on hemodialysis. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2012;39(3):207-15.
45. Urstad KH, Wahl AK, Andersen MH, Øyen O, Fagermoen MS. Renal recipients’ educational experiences in the early post-operative phase–a qualitative study. Scandinavian journal of caring sciences. 2012;26(4):635-42.
46. Xi W, Singh PM, Harwood L, Lindsay R, Suri R, Brown JB, Moist LM. Patient experiences and preferences on short daily and nocturnal home hemodialysis. Hemodialysis international. International Symposium on Home Hemodialysis. 2013;17(2):201-7.
47. Smith K, Coston M, Glock K, Elasy TA, Wallston KA, Ikizler TA, Cavanaugh KL. Patient perspectives on fluid management in chronic hemodialysis. Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation. 2010;20(5):334-41.

Búsqueda y Síntesis de Evidencia

 3.- ¿Qué tan significativos son los efectos indeseables anticipados?
Grande Moderado Pequeño Trivial Varía No lo sé

Grandes: El equipo elaborador de la Guía estimó que los efectos indeseables de «usar hidratación restringida» en comparación a «usar hidratación sin restricción» son grandes, considerando la evidencia, experiencia clínica, conocimiento de gestión o experiencia de las personas con la condición o problema de salud.

Consideraciones Adicionales

El panel de expertos considera que al restringir la hidratación, la población en general y en particular en los adultos mayores con enfermedad renal crónica etapa 5, pueden deteriorar la función renal residual.

Evidencia de investigación

Hidratación restringida para enfermedad renal crónica en etapa 5

 

Pacientes

 Enfermedad renal crónica en etapa 5

 

Intervención

Hidratación no restringida

 

Comparación

Hidratación restringida

 

Desenlaces

Efecto

Certeza de la evidencia

(GRADE)

Mensajes clave en términos sencillos

 
 

Mortalidad

No se identificaron revisiones sistemáticas ni estudios comparativos que permitan estimar el efecto de la intervención sobre la mortalidad.

 

Hospitalización

No se identificaron revisiones sistemáticas ni estudios comparativos que permitan estimar el efecto de la intervención sobre el riesgo de hospitalización.

 

GRADE: Grados de evidencia Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation.
Fecha de elaboración de la tabla: Agosto, 2018

Referencia

1. Palmer SC, Hanson CS, Craig JC, Strippoli GF, Ruospo M, Campbell K, Johnson DW, Tong A. Dietary and Fluid Restrictions in CKD: A Thematic Synthesis of Patient Views From Qualitative Studies. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation. 2015;65(4):559-73.
2. de Brito-Ashurst I, Perry L, Sanders TA, Thomas JE, Yaqoob MM, Dobbie H. Barriers and facilitators of dietary sodium restriction amongst Bangladeshi chronic kidney disease patients. Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association. 2011;24(1):86-95.
3. King N, Carroll C, Newton P, Dornan T. «You can’t cure it so you have to endure it»: the experience of adaptation to diabetic renal disease. Qualitative health research. 2002;12(3):329-46.
4. Hollingdale R, Sutton D, Hart K. Facilitating dietary change in renal disease: investigating patients’ perspectives. Journal of renal care. 2008;34(3):136-42.
5. Tong A, Sainsbury P, Chadban S, Walker RG, Harris DC, Carter SM, Hall B, Hawley C, Craig JC. Patients’ experiences and perspectives of living with CKD. American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation. 2009;53(4):689-700.
6. Walker R, James H, Burns A. Adhering to behaviour change in older pre-dialysis populations–what do patients think? A qualitative study. Journal of renal care. 2012;38(1):34-42.
7. Al-Arabi S. Quality of life: subjective descriptions of challenges to patients with end stage renal disease. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2006;33(3):285-92.
8. Bass EB, Jenckes MW, Fink NE, Cagney KA, Wu AW, Sadler JH, Meyer KB, Levey AS, Powe NR. Use of focus groups to identify concerns about dialysis. Choice Study. Medical decision making : an international journal of the Society for Medical Decision Making. 1999;19(3):287-95.
9. Beer J. Body image of patients with ESRD and following renal transplantation. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing). 1995;4(10):591-8.
10. Bennett PN, Bonner A, Andrew J, Nankumar J, Au C. Using images to communicate the hidden struggles of life on dialysis. J Commun Healthc. 2013;6(1):12-21.
11. Berg J, Berg BL. Compliance, diet and cultural factors among black Americans with end-stage renal disease. Journal of National Black Nurses’ Association : JNBNA. 1989;3(2):16-28.
12. Bordelon TD. An examimation of empowerment at a kidney center as experienced by persons who receive hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal disease. Montana State University. 1997;
13. Cases A, Dempster M, Davies M, Gamble G. The experience of individuals with renal failure participating in home haemodialysis: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of health psychology. 2011;16(6):884-94.
14. Costello T.. Conceptions of Illness and Adaptation in Adults With End-Stage Renal Disease: A Partnership Model of Inquiry. Boston, MA: Department of Counseling, Developmental Psychology and Research Methods, Counseling Psychology Program,. 1999;The Graduate School of Education, Boston College; 1999.
15. Curtin RB, Johnson HK, Schatell D. The peritoneal dialysis experience: insights from long-term patients. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2005;31(6):615-24.
16. Dekker W, Uerz I, Wils JP. Living well with end stage renal disease: patients’ narratives interrupted from a virtue perspective. Ethical theory and moral practice : an international forum. 2005;8(5):485-506.
17. Duffy M. Intrafamilial Kidney Transplants: The Impact on the Sibling Relationship Among Donors, Recipients and Volunteers. The Faculty of the Department of Professional Psychology, Chestnut Hill College. 2009;
18. Fex A, Ek AC, Söderhamn O. Self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home. Journal of clinical nursing. 2009;18(20):2809-17.
19. Fisher R, Gould D, Wainwright S, Fallon M.. Quality of life after renal transplantation. J Clin Nurs.. 1998;7((6)):553-563.
20. Ford-Anderson CA. The Impact of Demographics, Social Support and Health Beliefs on Adherence to Hemodialysis Treatment Regimen. New York, NY: Wurzeiler School of Social Work, Yeshiva University-Wilf Campus. 2010;
21. Giles S. Transformations: a phenomenological investigation into the life-world of home haemodialysis. Social work in health care. 2003;38(2):29-50.
22. Griva K, Ng HJ, Loei J, Mooppil N, McBain H, Newman SP. Managing treatment for end-stage renal disease–a qualitative study exploring cultural perspectives on facilitators and barriers to treatment adherence. Psychology & health. 2013;28(1):13-29.
23. Hume MR. Factors influencing dietary adherence as perceived by patients on long-term intermittent peritoneal dialysis. Nursing papers. Perspectives en nursing. 1984;16(1):38-54.
24. Humphreys S. Shifting life’s Focus: African American Dialysis Patients’ Experiences With Kidney Transplant Evaluation. Fairfax, VA: Graduate Faculty, George Mason University. 2011;
25. Ismail S, Lutchenburg A, Massey E, Clasassens L, van Busschbach J, Weimar W. Living kidney donation among ethnic minorities: a Dutch qualitative study on attitudes, communication, knowledge and needs of kidney patients. A report on the basis of the cooperation of the Kidney Transplant Unit of the Erasmus MC and the Department of Medical Psychology and Psychotherapy of the Erasmus MC. Med Psychol Psychother. 2010
26. Karamanidou C, Weinman J, Horne R. A qualitative study of treatment burden among haemodialysis recipients. Journal of health psychology. 2014;19(4):556-69.
27. Krespi Boothby MR, Salmon P. [Self-efficacy and hemodialysis treatment: a qualitative and quantitative approach]. Turk psikiyatri dergisi = Turkish journal of psychiatry. 2013;24(2):84-93.
28. Lai AY, Loh AP, Mooppil N, Krishnan DS, Griva K. Starting on haemodialysis: a qualitative study to explore the experience and needs of incident patients. Psychology, health & medicine. 2012;17(6):674-84.
29. Lam LW. Adherence to a Therapeutic Regimen Among Chinese Patients Undergoing Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis. Hong Kong: The Chinese University of Hong Kong. 2012;
30. Martin-McDonald K. Being dialysis-dependent: a qualitative perspective. Collegian (Royal College of Nursing, Australia). 2003;10(2):29-33.
31. Mayers JD. Dietary restrictions in maintenance hemodialysis: experiences of English speaking West Indian adults. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2000;27(3):315-9.
32. Munakata T. Psycho-social influence on self-care of the hemodialysis patient. Soc Sci Med. 1982;16:1254-1264.
33. Namiki S, Rowe J, Cooke M. Living with home-based haemodialysis: insights from older people. Journal of clinical nursing. 2010;19(3-4):547-55.
34. Ndlovu P, Louw J. Making sense of kidney transplantation: a view from African recipients. Clinical transplantation. 1998;12(3):250-5.
35. Polaschek N. ‘Doing dialysis at home’: client attitudes towards renal therapy. Journal of clinical nursing. 2007;16(3A):51-8.
36. Polaschek N. Living on dialysis: concerns of clients in a renal setting. Journal of advanced nursing. 2003;41(1):44-52.
37. Pradel FG, Mullins CD, Bartlett ST. Exploring donors’ and recipients’ attitudes about living donor kidney transplantation. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.). 2003;13(3):203-10.
38. Russ AJ, Shim JK, Kaufman SR. The value of «life at any cost»: talk about stopping kidney dialysis. Social science & medicine (1982). 2007;64(11):2236-47.
39. Rygh E, Arild E, Johnsen E, Rumpsfeld M. Choosing to live with home dialysis-patients’ experiences and potential for telemedicine support: a qualitative study. BMC nephrology. 2012;13:13.
40. Sinclair PM, Parker V. Pictures and perspectives: a unique reflection on interdialytic weight gain. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2009;36(6):589-96; quiz 597.
41. Stanfill A, Bloodworth R, Cashion A. Lessons learned: experiences of gaining weight by kidney transplant recipients. Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.). 2012;22(1):71-8.
42. Sussmann K. Patients’ experiences of a dialysis diet and their implications for the role of the dietitian. Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation. 2001;11(3):172-7.
43. Theofilou P, Synodinou C, Panagiotaki H. Undergoing haemodialysis: A qualitative study to investigate the lived experiences of patients. European Journal of Psychology of Education. 2013;9(1):19-32.
44. Tovazzi ME, Mazzoni V. Personal paths of fluid restriction in patients on hemodialysis. Nephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. 2012;39(3):207-15.
45. Urstad KH, Wahl AK, Andersen MH, Øyen O, Fagermoen MS. Renal recipients’ educational experiences in the early post-operative phase–a qualitative study. Scandinavian journal of caring sciences. 2012;26(4):635-42.
46. Xi W, Singh PM, Harwood L, Lindsay R, Suri R, Brown JB, Moist LM. Patient experiences and preferences on short daily and nocturnal home hemodialysis. Hemodialysis international. International Symposium on Home Hemodialysis. 2013;17(2):201-7.
47. Smith K, Coston M, Glock K, Elasy TA, Wallston KA, Ikizler TA, Cavanaugh KL. Patient perspectives on fluid management in chronic hemodialysis. Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation. 2010;20(5):334-41.

Búsqueda y Síntesis de Evidencia

 4.- ¿Cuál es la certeza general de la evidencia sobre efectos?
Muy baja Baja Moderada Alta Ningún estido incluído

Ningún estudio incluido: No se encontraron estudios que respondieran la preguntan de interés, por lo tanto existe considerable incertidumbre respecto del efecto de «usar hidratación restringida» en comparación a «usar hidratación sin restricción».

 5.- ¿Hay incertidumbre importante o variabilidad sobre qué tanto valora la gente los desenlaces principales?
Incertidumbre o variabilidad importantes Posiblemente hay incertidumbre o variabilidad importantes Probablemente no hay incertidumbre ni variabilidad importantes No hay variabilidad o incertidumbre importante

Probablemente no hay incertidumbre ni variabilidad importantes: En función de la evidencia de investigación, experiencia clínica, conocimiento de gestión o experiencia de las personas con la condición o problema de salud, el equipo elaborador de la Guía consideró que posiblemente existe incertidumbre o variabilidad importante respecto a lo que escogería una persona informada de los efectos deseables e indeseables de «usar hidratación restringida» y «usar hidratación sin restricción».

Consideraciones Adicionales

El panel de expertos considera que un paciente bien informado probablemente optaría por no restringir la hidratación.

Evidencia de investigación

El objetivo de una revisión sistemática de literatura fue resumir las perspectivas de los pacientes y las opciones de manejo dietético y de fluidos en enfermos renales crónicos(1)
Los resultados del estudio informan que:
– Algunos pacientes deciden comer y beber normalmente en situaciones sociales y «pagar por ello» más tarde con síntomas debidos a sobrecarga de líquidos.
– Algunos pacientes tenían la sensación de que las restricciones tienen pocos beneficios a corto o largo plazo o incluso pueden causar daño.
– La comida y los líquidos fueron vistos como necesidades físicas que eran «Elementos indispensables para la vida”. Los pacientes no podían concebir cómo el consejo médico que conduce a la deshidratación podría ser beneficioso.

Referencia
(1)Palmer SC, Hanson CS, Craig JC, Strippoli GFM, Ruospo M, Campbell K, et al. Dietary and fluid restrictions in CKD: a thematic synthesis of patient views from qualitative studies. Am J Kidney Dis Off J Natl Kidney Found. 2015 Apr;65(4):559–73.

Búsqueda y Síntesis de Evidencia

 6.- El balance entre efectos deseables e indeseables favorece la intervención o la comparación?
Favorece la comparación Probablemente favorece la comparación No favorece la intervención ni la comparación Probablemente favorece la intervención Favorece la intervención Varía No lo sé

Favorece la comparación: Considerando que la intervención es «usar hidratación restringida» y la comparación es «usar hidratación sin restricción», el equipo elaborador de la Guía opinó que el balance entre efectos deseables e indeseables claramente favorece «usar hidratación sin restricción».

 7.- ¿Qué tan grandes son los recursos necesarios (costos)?
Costos extensos Costos moderados Costos y ahorros despreciables Ahorros moderados Ahorros extensos Varía No lo sé

Costos y ahorros despreciables: El equipo elaborador de la Guía consideró que los costos y ahorros de «usar hidratación restringida» son despreciables si se compara con «usar hidratación sin restricción», en función de los antecedentes, experiencia clínica, conocimiento de gestión o experiencia de los pacientes.

Consideraciones Adicionales

El panel de expertos menciona que en general los medicamentos son baratos.

Evidencia de investigación

A continuación se muestran los precios referenciales de las prestaciones sanitarias de realizar intervención multidisciplinaria (médico, enfermera, nutricionista, sicólogo y asistente social) e intervención realizada solo por médico de modo que el equipo elaborador de la Guía se pudiese pronunciar al respecto y no debe ser utilizado para otros fines.

*Ítem

intervención multidisciplinaria (médico, enfermera, nutricionista, sicólogo y asistente social)

intervención realizada solo por médico

Médico(Nefrologo)

$14.340

$14.340

Enfermera

$7.365

 

 

Atención integral Nutricionista

$24.510 por 3 sesiones ($8.170 cada sesión)

 

* Consultados los aranceles FONASA Modalidad Libre Elección (MLE) 2018

Búsqueda y Síntesis de Evidencia

 8.- ¿La costo-efectividad de la intervención beneficia la intervención o la comparación?
Favorece la comparación Probablemente favorece la comparación No favorece la intervención ni la comparación Probablemente favorece la intervención Favorece la intervención Varía Ningún estudio incluido

Favorece la comparación: Considerando que la intervención es «usar hidratación restringida» y la comparación es «usar hidratación sin restricción», el equipo elaborador de la Guía opinó que claramente la alternativa más costo-efectiva es «usar hidratación sin restricción».

Consideraciones Adicionales

El panel de expertos considera que la hidratación sin restricción podría favorecer mantener una función renal estable y evitar complicaciones, hospitalizaciones, e incluso diálisis.

Evidencia de investigación

No se realizó la búsqueda de estudios que abordaran la costo-efectividad de usar hidratación restringida ya que no es considerado una intervención de alto costo (Anual $2.418.399 y Mensual $201.533).*

*Ministerio de Salud. Decreto 80: Determinar umbral nacional de costo anual al que se refiere el artículo 6° de la Ley 20.850 [Internet]. Santiago; 2015 Nov.

 9.- ¿Cuál sería el impacto en equidad en salud?
Reducido Probablemente reducido Probablemente ningún impacto Probablemente aumentado Aumentado Varía No lo sé

Probablemente ningún impacto: El equipo elaborador de la Guía consideró que probablemente no tendría ningún impacto en la equidad en salud si se recomendase «usar hidratación restringida», dado que identificó grupos o contextos que actualmente tiene barreras de acceso importantes, ya sea en términos económicos, geográficos u otros.

 10.- ¿La intervención es aceptable para las partes interesadas?
No Probablemente no Probablemente sí Varía No lo sé

Probablemente no: El equipo elaborador de la Guía consideró que «usar hidratación restringida» probablemente NO es aceptable para las partes interesadas (profesionales de la salud, gestores de centros de salud, directivos de centros de salud, pacientes, cuidadores, seguros de salud, otros).

Consideraciones Adicionales

El panel de expertos considera que los pacientes tienen la creencia que la restricción de líquidos permitiría preservar su salud.

 11.- ¿Es factible implementar la intervención?
No Probablemente no Probablemente sí Varía No lo sé

Sí: El equipo elaborador de la Guía consideró que «usar hidratación restringida» SÍ es factible implementar, contemplando la capacidad de la red asistencial, los recursos humanos disponibles a nivel país, recursos financieros, etc.